Abstracts are invited for a session held by the GIScience Research Group (GIScRG) at the Royal Geographical Society – Institute of British Geographers International Conference 2012. The conference runs between 3rd – 5th July 2012.

More about the session:

In December 2011 The Portas Review put forward 28 recommendations to the UK government regarding the future of ‘our’ high street.  Within the report and surrounding media there is a sense of ‘crisis’ associated with such spaces and by implication with the ‘moral values’ of ‘community’, ‘localism’ and ‘sense of belonging’ associated with high street.  Such approaches show that attention needs to be paid the spaces of the everyday such as the UK high street to further understand what these spaces do in an economic, social and cultural sense and how changes in such spaces affect not only economic stability but orderings and understandings of such ideas as ‘local’ ‘neighbourhood’ and ‘identity’.

With approaches within the social sciences from authors such as Ingold (2007) and Massey (2005) the role of materiality and spatial practices in everyday social life is receiving increasing attention.  Within this the role of the physical configuration of the built environment and its relationship to the social organisation of everyday life, much potential exists to either advance current understandings or develop new critical understandings of the role of the spaces of the built environment in social relations.

We invite proposals for papers that present critical work on change or continuity of the ‘public spaces of the everyday’, such as the suburban high street through collaborative and mixed methods approaches across a range of disciplines including GIS, architecture, anthropology and sociology. We welcome proposals that work across disciplines and in particular combine quantitative and qualitative approaches.  Preference is for work that combines historical perspectives to the suburban realm and high street although we welcome submissions of critical investigation of the relationship between shifting patterns of economic, social and cultural land uses and the types of socio-spatial relations they engender in other ‘spaces’.

The GIScRG will provide one bursary for this session, sponsored by the GIScRG for a paper (co-)authored by a postgraduate student; priority will be given to postgraduate students also delivering the paper. The bursary will cover the reduced conference fee for the student for the duration of the conference. It is a requirement that the student is an RGS-IBG Postgraduate Fellow at the time the bursary is awarded [Annual membership costs from £27 (with no joining fee)].

Participants are asked to use an innovative style of presentation; to prepare a presentation with full-slide images, with a maximum of ten words per slide. We intend to accept only four presentations to allow for discussion time. The abstracts will be circulated to presenters and they will be asked to prepare responses to key ideas from all the abstracts in order to enable a useful discussion at the end of the session. Titles and abstracts (up to 500 words) for this session should be sent to both David Jeevendrampillai (david.jeevendrampillai.10[AT]ucl.ac.uk) and Ashley Dhanani (ashley.dhanani[AT]ucl.ac.uk) by Monday 9th January 2012. The session conveners (David Jeevendrampillai, Ashley Dhanani, Mordechai (Muki) Haklay and Laura Vaughan) are members of the Adaptable Suburbs project team at UCL.

Abstracts are invited for a session held by the GIScience Research Group (GIScRG) at the Royal Geographical Society – Institute of British Geographers International Conference 2012. The conference runs between 3rd – 5th July 2012.

More about the session:

Interdisciplinary research is not only an extremely difficult balancing act, but one which is becoming more frequent. Geography and concepts relating to place and space often serve as a unifying factor around which information from other disciplines can be clustered. In such research, experts in various fields come together for a shared goal, but first need to establish common ground, grasping the opportunity (or threat) that teams can be comprised of researchers from areas as diverse as anthropology, architecture, computer science, economics, tourism, electronic engineering, physics and biology, in addition to geographers.

Challenges that face interdisciplinary teams go beyond those encountered in team work (such as the personalities of the different team members, different management and working styles, national cultures and so forth).  Interdisciplinary team members must also understand the basics and sometimes the detail of work in other disciplines – which requires time and effort from participants in each research area.  Disciplinary cultures can be different (for example presentation and paper writing style, frequency and nature of publications). Terms that mean one thing in one discipline can mean something completely different in another. Technical challenges also arise – how to facilitate data and information sharing within the project when different levels of technological use and understanding are common and different software packages are utilised within each discipline.  Such teams may be multi-locational, reducing the frequency of face-to-face meetings. In addition there is a potential internal conflict between working on research core to a discipline versus participating in a collaborative effort with outsiders. 

The session organisers invite proposals for papers from researchers interested in theoretical or applied learning, with experience in working with teams that bring together people in a multi-national or multi-locational and interdisciplinary context. We seek to evaluate and share both positive and less successful experiences and techniques for interdisciplinary working, with a view to identifying elements of best and worst practice. We welcome proposals that explore issues including:

  • Interdisciplinary Learning: the challenges and rewards associated with becoming familiar with another discipline.
  • Data and Information Sharing: media and methods used to share information effectively, as well as accounts of those that do not.
  • Conflict Management: addressing the hurdles of disciplinary differences, misunderstandings and team growing pains.
  • Project Management Issues: such as the choice between virtual and face-to-face meetings and issues relating to meeting frequency.

The GIScRG will provide one bursary for this session, sponsored by the GIScRG for a paper (co-)authored by a postgraduate student; priority will be given to postgraduate students also delivering the paper. The bursary will cover the reduced conference fee for the student for the duration of the conference. It is a requirement that the student is an RGS-IBG Postgraduate Fellow at the time the bursary is awarded [Annual membership costs from £27 (with no joining fee)].

We are looking for people to share the lessons they have learned in order to continue to push forward interdisciplinary work.  The session will be run by Claire Ellul (UCL). Titles, abstracts (no longer than 250 words) and 5 key words, along with contact details should be emailed to Patrick Rickles (p.rickles[AT]ucl.ac.uk) by Friday 16th December 2011. Notification of acceptance will be given by mid-January 2012.

Abstracts are invited for a session held by the GIScience Research Group (GIScRG) at the Royal Geographical Society – Institute of British Geographers International Conference 2012. The conference runs between 3rd – 5th July 2012.

More about the session:

This session aims to bring together researchers to report on progress in diverse types of modelling that has direct impacts on a variety of policy domains.  We encourage the submission of papers that present novel use of new or established methodologies using GIS or bespoke models.  We are particularly interested in policy applications in the area of health, population dynamics, crime/security, urban planning and retail.  We intend to represent the interdisciplinary nature of policy research and analysis with a focus on geographic tools and methods.

Papers may include, but are not limited to: 

  • Estimating and projecting populations and components of demographic change
  • Understanding spatial patterns of crime and issues of security
  • Models for decision support and urban sustainability
  • Modelling different patterns of individual behaviour
  • Spatial modelling/estimating disease prevalence in small areas
  • Modelling the impact of policy change on retail networks 

The conveners are in discussion with the Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy journal to publish high quality submissions in a special edition. 

The GIScRG will provide one bursary for this session, sponsored by the GIScRG for a paper (co-)authored by a postgraduate student; priority will be given to postgraduate students also delivering the paper. The bursary will cover the reduced conference fee for the student for the duration of the conference. It is a requirement that the student is an RGS-IBG Postgraduate Fellow at the time the bursary is awarded [Annual membership costs from £27 (with no joining fee)].

Titles, abstracts (no longer than 250 words) and 5 key words, should be emailed to Dianna Smith (dianna.m.smith[AT]gmail.com), Adam Dennett (a.dennett[AT]ucl.ac.uk) and Alison Heppenstall (a.j.heppenstall[AT]leeds.ac.uk) by Friday 16th December 2011. Notification of acceptance will be given by mid-January 2012.

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Abstracts are invited for a session held by the GIScience Research Group (GIScRG) at the Royal Geographical Society – Institute of British Geographers International Conference 2012. The conference runs between 3rd – 5th July 2012.

More about the session:

This session aims to bring together researchers to report on progress in diverse types of automata systems in social simulation. We encourage the submission of theoretical, experimental, methodological and application papers related to Cellular Automata (CA) and Agent‐Based Modelling (ABM). Papers may include, but are not limited to: 

  • Artificial social systems.
  • Agents and social networks.
  • Modelling complexity in social simulations.
  • Large scale social simulation.
  • Social behaviour, social actions and interactions.
  • Models of competition, cooperation and negotiation.
  • Multi‐agent evolution: adaptation and learning.
  • Hybrid automata models.
  • Validation and verification of simulation results and simulation systems.
  • Novel approaches to visualisation 

The GIScRG will provide one bursary for this session, sponsored by the GIScRG for a paper (co-)authored by a postgraduate student; priority will be given to postgraduate students also delivering the paper. The bursary will cover the reduced conference fee for the student for the duration of the conference. It is a requirement that the student is an RGS-IBG Postgraduate Fellow at the time the bursary is awarded [Annual membership costs from £27 (with no joining fee)].

Titles and abstracts (no longer than 250 words) should be emailed to Alison Heppenstall (a.j.heppenstall[AT]leeds.ac.uk), Mike Batty (m.batty[AT]ucl.ac.uk) and Mark Birkin (m.h.birkin[AT]leeds.ac.uk) by Friday 16th December 2011. Notification of acceptance will be given by mid-January 2012.

Abstracts are invited for a session held jointly by the GIScience Research Group (GIScRG) and the Transport Geography Research Group (TGRG) at the Royal Geographical Society – Institute of British Geographers International Conference 2012. The conference runs between 3rd – 5th July 2012.

More about the session:

Geospatial technologies are an important component of transport geography and transport applications, and increasingly influence everyday mobilities through vehicle navigation systems as well as location-based services on personal mobile devices. In this session we seek contributions across the range of geographers interested in GIS and GPS uses in a transport context, whether conducting mobilities-related research, mainstream transport geography, qualitative uses of GIS, or creating innovations in integrated and Intelligent Transport Systems. We are interested in concepts that motivate this work as well as the particular methodological and substantive aspects of this field. Please note that this session is focusing on people’s mobilities and private/public transport rather than freight.

Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • state-of-the-art in space-time analysis and visualisation beyond GIS;
  • ‘born-digital’ mobility data and the digital security of everyday mobility traces;
  • difference and transport;
  • documentary practices of everyday mobilities with qualitative GIS;
  • development of location-based services and impacts on mobilities;
  • inaccuracy issues and integrity of positioning information in integrated transport systems (including GIS/GPS/mapping/digitisation/cartographic errors).

The GIScRG will provide one bursary for this session, sponsored by the GIScRG for a paper (co-)authored by a postgraduate student; priority will be given to postgraduate students also delivering the paper. The bursary will cover the reduced conference fee for the student for the duration of the conference. It is a requirement that the student is an RGS-IBG Postgraduate Fellow at the time the bursary is awarded [Annual membership costs from £27 (with no joining fee)].

Titles and abstracts (no longer than 250 words) should be emailed to Seraphim Alvanides (s.alvanides[AT]gmail.com), Kate Pangbourne (k.pangbourne[AT]abdn.ac.uk) and Matthew W.Wilson (matthew.w.wilson[AT]uky.edu) by Friday 16th December 2011. Notification of acceptance will be given by mid-January 2012.

 

Abstracts are invited for a session at the annual conference of the Royal Geographical Society – Institute of British Geographers conference 2011. The conference runs between 31st August – 2nd September 2011; the exact date of this special session is to be confirmed. The session is hosted by the GIScRG, and will be chaired by Dr. Hanif Rahemtulla and Professor Paul Longley.

More about the session:

“The term “Open Data” refers to the philosophical and methodological approach to the democratization of data enabling citizens to access and create value through the reuse of public sector information. Today, Open Data is gathering momentum and forms part of a global movement linked to Open Access and comparable to other Open movements such as Open Source. To date, this movement is being led by government institutions in the UK, USA and Australia through pioneering initiatives such as Data.Gov and the London DataStore. These initiatives, which are being replicated across cities, states and countries (i.e., Open Toronto and New Zealand Open Data Catalogue) provide access to “non-sensitive government datasets, at no cost, to citizens, citizen groups, non-governmental-organisations (NGOs) and businesses” (Lauriault, 2008).

The Open Data Initiative will, it is envisaged, support greater transparency and accountability within Government and create new economic and social value (see Oxera Study, 1999; Cambridge Study, 2008). Furthermore, as O’Reilly (2009) and others argue, the advent of Open Data will fundamentally change the nature by which citizens interact with government. Specifically, the release of public data online and public APIs (which is already underway in some places) will create a platform supporting the development of third-party communication applications outside of government (Headd, 2010). This it is expected will provide a vehicle for expanding public outreach and enhancing public engagement leading to “a more responsive and citizen-focused government” (Madera, 2009).

Today, the Open Data movement has created great excitement in the developer community with a seemingly endless stream of novel and innovative applications, tools and visualizations that repurposes and enriches public data – and has lead to some of the most exciting developments in mobile GIS, web-cartography and LBS in recent years.

However, while Open Data gives rise to a many new opportunities it also poses many challenges. As Boyd (2010) states, access to public information to promote transparency represents only the first step to a more informed citizenry. The success of Open Data will depend in part upon addressing existing barriers to access which encompasses issues such as digital inclusion and information literacy. As such, there is much work still to do to make this promised future happen.

This Special Session aims to bring together some of the key developers, academics and writers on Open Data to document its lineage, debate its philosophy and methods and to envision its future. Contributions are welcome from any source, and in any style appropriate to the arguments being made.”

The session will be a series of presented papers with a lively explorative session in which the four/five scholars will debate about alternative interpretations/methods/solutions within this emerging research area on Open Data.

For more information, please contact the session convenors, Hanif Rahemtulla (Hanif.Rahemtulla[AT]nottingham.ac.uk) and/or Paul Longley (plongley[AT]geog.ucl.ac.uk). Please send abstracts (350 words max.) and key words to Hanif Rahemtulla, by 20th February 2011.

Further details about the conference can be found here.

Abstracts are invited for a session at the annual conference of the Royal Geographical Society – Institute of British Geographers conference 2011. The conference runs between 31st August – 2nd September 2011; the exact date of this special session is to be confirmed. The session is jointly hosted by the GIScRG and the Geography of Health Research Group (GHRG).

More about the session:

“This session is concerned with the research agenda related to the role natural, social and physical environments have on health related behaviours. The connection between these spatial and the social elements plays a vital role in developing more liveable, sustainable and resilient communities. We would like to call for papers in line with the following topics:

* Exploring the implications of current environments on the health and well-being of different groups and communities
* New methods for measuring and visualizing environmental indicators, people’s behaviour and the relationships between them
* Innovative methods for promoting healthy and active lifestyles
* Evidence based policy recommendations in relation to healthy living environments and behaviour.”

The session will take the form of 5 presented papers. Each will be 20-25 minutes including time for questions.

For more information, please contact the session convenors, Yi Gong (GongY2[AT]cardiff.ac.uk) and/or Catherine (Kate) Jones (Kate.Jones[AT]port.ac.uk). Please send abstracts (350 words max.) to the session convenors, by 20th February 2011.

Further details about the conference can be found here.

Abstracts are invited for a session at the annual conference of the Royal Geographical Society – Institute of British Geographers conference 2011. The conference runs between 31st August – 2nd September 2011; the exact date of this special session is to be confirmed. The session is jointly hosted by the GIScRG and the Geography of Leisure and Tourism Research Group (GLTRG)

More about the session:

“With this year’s theme being “The Geographical Imagination” we invite papers and presentations from members who wish to present their work that links aspects of GIScience to conceptualising tourism in geographic space. Because tourists exist in space at a specific time, we are particularly interested in papers and presentations that address how tourists/visitors interact with their environment and how this can be modelled in geographic space. We welcome papers and presentations that employ GIScience to the study of geography of leisure and tourism, including:

* Geographic information systems and spatial analyses
* Remote Sensing
* Satellite Positioning
* Tourist mobility tracking and monitoring
* Wayfinding
* Web 2 technology and volunteered geographic information
* Geovisualising tourism landscapes.”

Format of the session should be 4-5 presentations of 20 mins with 5 mins of questions (and 5 min change-over).

For more information, please contact the session convenors, Steve Carver (s.j.carver[AT]leeds.ac.uk) and Colin Arrowsmith (colin.arrowsmith[AT]rmit.edu.au). Please send abstracts (350 words max.) to the session convenors, by 20th February 2011.

Further details about the conference can be found at: www.rgs.org/AC2011.

Call for Papers – RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2011

On November 20, 2010, in RGS IBG, by GIScience Research Group

Abstracts are invited for a session at the annual conference of the Royal Geographical Society – Institute of British Geographers annual conference 2011. The conference theme is the ‘Geographical Imagination’, and will take place from 31st August – 2nd September, in London.

Sessions may take the form of presented papers, panels, practitioner forums, discussions or workshops. Innovative sessions and formats are encouraged. Sessions are 1 hour 40 minutes long. Most sessions will contain five 20-minute presentations, which includes time for questions, or four 20-minute presentations with discussion and questions at the end. Interactive short papers sessions (5 to 10 min presentations with plenary discussion at the end) usually accommodate up to 8 papers.

To apply for a GIScRG sponsored session, please send your session proposal (max 500 words), the name of the session convenor(s) and the session format (e.g. panel, paper session, discussion) to Yi Gong (Yi.gong[AT]manchester.ac.uk) by 24th November 2010.

More about the conference theme:

“Visualisation, mapping, environmental reconstruction, landscape symbolism, terrain modelling, place picturing, virtual worlds, visionary worlds, cultural ecologies,  climatic scenarios, patterned ground, sites of representation, image making, theory building, field observation…so many subjects and methods, topics and technologies, across the broad spectrum of geography, are powerfully shaped by a geographical imagination.�
The conference will explore many dimensions of the geographical imagination, including its histories and futures, meanings and materials, pleasures and politics, practices and effects.  We welcome sessions and papers on the place of the imagination in geography’s many fields of enquiry, including multi-disciplinary fields within and beyond geography, and those which engage with a wider public.�
Contributors are invited to address both traditional and experimental aspects of the geographical imagination, its down to earthness as well as its sense of adventure, its role in creating factual, measurable and practical knowledge as well as conjectural and speculative findings.  We also welcome contributions that explore the geographical imagination as a medium of communication and dissemination, crossing communities within and beyond geography, and its role in making an impact in a wider world.”

Further details about the conference can be found here.

RGS Annual Conference: Recommended Sessions

On August 12, 2010, in Conference Session, by James Cheshire

Here are our recommended sessions for those who have an interest in GIScience and are attending the forthcoming RGS Annual Conference.

2011 GB Census: Planning Ahead.

Friday; Session 2231; RGS-IBG Drayson Room; Link to speakers.

Analysing and Visualising Social Change: Postgraduate research in GIScience.*

Thursday; Session 2143; Electrical Engineering, Room 509a; Link to speakers.

Distance, Speed and Time: The Fundamentals of Transport Geography.

Wednesday; Session 354; RGS-IBG Pavilion; Link to Speakers.

Enhancing Complex Social Simulations with Automata Systems.*

Thursday; Session 3175; Electrical Engineering, Room 509a; Link to speakers.

GIS for Environmental Modelling.*

Thursday; Session 4200; Electrical Engineering, Room 509a; Link to speakers.

Governance and the Geoweb.*

Friday; Session 1226; Sherfield Building, Room 7; Link to Speakers.

Postgraduate Research in Transport (1): Mobility, sustainability and behaviour of individuals.

Friday; Session 1219; Sir Alexander Fleming Building, Room 121; Link to Speakers.

Postgraduate Research in Transport (2): Infrastructure, development and urban form.

Friday; Session 2235; Sir Alexander Fleming Building, Room 121; Link to Speakers.

The Spatial Dimensions of Health.

Wednesday; Session 123; Sherfield Building, Room 7; Link to Speakers.

There is no place like home! – Why historians would want to use GIS.

Friday; Session 3252; RGS-IBG Lowther Room; Link to Speakers.

*GIScience Research Group organised sessiom.

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